Greyhound turns 100

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A neat milestone got marked this week at the headquarters of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) in Washington D.C. this week: Greyhound Bus Lines, perhaps one of the most ubiquitous names in bus travel, officially hit the century mark his year.

That’s pretty amazing when you think about it, for since Greyhound started out back in 1914, we’ve witnessed not only the rise of air travel but space travel as well. And yet here’s Greyhound, still plugging along, still carrying the good folks of America from here to there and everywhere in between.

To commemorate its 100th anniversary, Greyhound is also kicking off a “Centennial Tour” to highlight how the company has changed over the long years. Comprised of two “mobile museums,” the tour plans to visit nearly 40 cities over the next six months and show off a variety of memorabilia, such as signage and vintage driver uniforms.

All sorts of “classic coaches” will be traveling along with the tour, too, including a 1914 model “Hupmobile” (seen above at right) all the way up to a 1984-era Americruiser 2. [To view more photos, click here.]

“Greyhound has come a long way from one vehicle operating out of Hibbing, MN, to its current standing as one of the world’s most iconic brands,” noted Dave Leach, Greyhound’s president and CEO, during the DOT event. “We’re proud of our rich heritage, and the changes we’ve made to improve the travel experience are what we’re highlighting during the Centennial Tour.”

And to still be a growing and thriving business after 100 years – with Greyhound now serving 3,800 destinations across North America,  providing not just passenger transport but Greyhound Package Express (GPX) freight service as well as charter bus service, too – is quite an accomplishment.

So go, dog, go – and may keep going safely on for another 100 years as well.

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