Navistar International Corp. will be allowed to sell new heavy-duty truck engines in California as long as the company has pollution credits to offset its engines’ lack of compliance with the federal standard for engine exhaust, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

In January, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) prohibited the sale of Navistar’s heavy-duty engines in California and nine other states that adopted California’s air-quality regulations beginning in February. However, in a decision last week, CARB will now allow Navistar to sell engines in California “as long as they have credits,” Annette Hebert, chief of CARB’s mobile source operations division told the Journal. “But once they’re out of credits, they can’t.”

CARB’s latest order provides Navistar with some breathing room as it waits for CARB and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to certify that the company’s engines meet the latest standard for nitrogen oxide in diesel exhaust, the Journal reports.

Navistar has been relying on an accumulation of pollution credits to meet the EPA’s latest standard for nitrogen oxide in diesel exhaust. Navistar recently submitted its 13L engine to the EPA and CARB for certification. The company expects to offer its 15.2L and 10.5L engines for certification as well.