Kansas has become the 17th state to adopt the Drivewyze PreClear bypass inspection site service. The service uses tablets, smartphones and select electronic onboard recorders to provide commercial vehicles with inspection site bypass opportunities.

“With Drivewyze PreClear now available at all eight weigh station locations in Kansas, truck freight can be moved through the interior of the United States with fewer delays,” said Brian Heath, president of Drivewyze Inc. 

Using cellular networks and the Internet to add transponder-like functionality to tablets, smartphones and electronic onboard recorders, PreClear notifies the driver of an upcoming inspection site 2 miles out. At the 1 mile mark, drivers receive permission to either bypass or pull into the inspection site if the state enforcement agency has an agreement with Drivewyze to grant bypasses to fleets that meet the agency’s standards. 

Whether fleets meet the standards is based on the carrier’s safety records and other standard information checks and determined solely by participating law enforcement agencies.

Provided their registration and taxes are in order, along with a strong safety score, most fleets and operators can expect to receive bypasses about 75% of the time, Heath said. Those with the strongest safety records and hard-earned ISS scores can earn bypasses up to 98% of the time.

“We are excited about adding any technology that helps us improve highway safety,” said Capt. Chris Turner, commander of the Kansas Highway Patrol’s Commercial Motor Carriers Safety Assistance Program and the Kansas accident reconstruction team. “Because Kansas lies at the center of the country, we have a large of amount of truck freight that passes through Kansas as it travels our major interstates and highways.”

The state of Kansas has 9,503 center lane miles of highway and 236 center lane miles on the Kansas Turnpike, a toll road operated by the Kansas Turnpike Authority.